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Archive for the ‘Review’ Category

[Review] Krieg Ohne Hass

I managed to snaggle a copy of these rules a few weeks ago, published by Lance Flint (a frequent contributor to the Honour Forum run by Sam Mustafa), and available from Magister Militum among other places. They’re pretty inexpensive, and harken back to the old photocopy style of years past, with a few photos and diagrams, but Lance eschews the glossy hardback filled with stuff approach in favour of a slimmed down model – the rules themselves are only about 20 pages in length. There are various lists for compiling armies for Operation Crusader also available online for free at the 3mm Miniatures yahoo group.

 

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[Review] Aurelian

I’ve played a couple of test games now of Sam Mustafa’s new game Aurelian, so thought I’d do a quick review. It’s both similar to and a departure from Sam’s other games; players who have played other games by Sam will pick up on similar mechanisms, particular the movement rules which are very similar to those found in Bluecher. In other respects, it’s very different. For one, the time frame is outside of Sam’s usual area (18th C in Might and Reason and Maurice, Napoleonic in Grand Armee, Lasalle and Bluecher, and ACW in Longstreet), seeing as it focuses on the ancient world, and even more so, unlike other ancients rules, one that focuses on the 3rd century crisis of the Roman Empire.

 

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I backed the War and Empire kickstarter campaign by Forged in Battle a while ago, which was very successful, and ended up with quite a lot of figures as a result which arrived a month or two ago. Since the figures are now about to appear on the open market, I thought I’d do a quick review of them. I’ll add pics here and there throughout this post of the figures, starting with the ones I’ve painted so far (still on their painting sticks).

Roman Velites, unit 1

Roman Velites, unit 1 (from pack WE-RP-02)

Roman Velites, unit 1, reverse side

Roman Velites, unit 1, reverse side

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[Bluecher] A review

Bluecher, Sam Mustafa’s new game, is out now, and after a short test game, I thought I’d give my opinion of these grand scale Napoleonic rules. First of all, some background: I first bought Sam’s Grand Armee not too long after it came out, and was suitably impressed; so much so that when he released Lasalle, I bought it on the day of release, sight unseen, and have done so for Maurice and Longstreet too (as well as belatedly buying Might and Reason). I’m an unashamed fan of Sam’s rules; they have just the right mix of period flavour and simplicity of design that I like, and can guarantee a game within an evening’s play.

Bluecher has arrived!

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Played a short game of these new rules the other day, splitting my Impetus HYW English army into two, one side being the English, and the other side portraying the French, and so I thought I’d do a review of them. They use the same basing as Impetus (you can also use 4 bases of DB* or FoG in place of a unit), but as the Impetus bases look better with their mini dioramas, and since I don’t have anything based up for DB* / FoG any more, Impetus basing it is then. For those not in the know, that’s 80mm base widths, with varying base depths depending on type of unit, from 10-15mm for skirmishers to 60mm for cavalry. The book does suggest that the game can be played with any basing as long as its the same for both sides though.

Sword and Spear rules

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Maurice is the latest game from Sam Mustafa (Lasalle, Might and Reason, Grand Armee), and is intended to portray the battles of the 18th century. In some ways, it is reminiscent of Lasalle, but in other ways, it varies considerably from those rules. There is no fixed scale; a unit (represented by 4 bases of cavalry or infantry, or a single stand of artillery) can be telescoped up or down to denote a battalion or a brigade, or anything in between. The number of figures on a base does not matter either, and here is no removal of bases unless the entire unit routs or gets completely defeated in combat. There are several unit types, being regular infantry and cavalry, irregular infantry and cavalry, and artillery. Regular troops are also rated for training, being conscript, trained or elite.

There is a simple points system or creating your force, with a rather elegant system for dealing with the sort of player who wants as many elite forces as possible, or wants to be able to swamp the field with a massive artillery battery. The first elite unit costs an extra 2 points, the second costs an extra 3 points, the third an extra 4 points, and so on. With artillery, the mechanic is the same, starting from a single point for 1 unit, 2 points for a second unit, 3 points for a third unit, and so on. In this way, a player can decide to go for as many elites as possible, but will end up with some really expensive units very quickly. His opponent, on the other hand, can decide to go for quantity, mixing conscript (or irregular) units with trained units, and will probably have a numerical advantage of 2 or 3 to 1. Similarly, a force can be made primarily of irregular troops, but this is a dangerous proposal since irregular troops caught in the open are toast. They do excel in rough terrain, however, and with the right combination of cards and terrain choices, they can be very effective, since they cost half the price in points of trained regular units, and are roughly on a par with them in rough terrain. Since they also have numbers of their side, this can be an effective (if risky) army. The system for creating an army is thus one that can cater to all kinds of players – small, highly elite forces, masses of troops to swamp the enemy, and guerrilla-style irregular armies are all not only easily created, but can be effective. There is no super army in Maurice that everyone will want to play irrespective of the players’ style. (more…)

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